C2 Paint



C2 PAINT: ENHANCING COMMUNITIES THROUGH RESTORATION

Like the C2 Paint brand, many of our partners use their expertise and resources to ignite positive changes in their communities. From educational programs and sponsorships to charity affiliations and restorations, the people behind C2 realize the importance of paying it forward.

In the beautiful town of Providence, Rhode Island, Harry Adler is a household name. A founding partner of C2 Paint, his family has owned one of the most beloved businesses in the area, Adler’s Hardware, for nearly a century.

When Woodrow Wilson was president, we were here. When women gained the right to vote, we were here. When man first walked on the moon, we were here. We’ve survived the Great Depression, Y2K and even the Big Box stores.

Offering paint, hardware, home goods and a design center, Adler’s has evolved throughout the years to cater to the needs of its customers. For Adler, being a business owner is more than just making money, it’s about being a valuable part of the community. He works with a variety of historical preservation programs, including the Providence Preservation Society and a variety of art programs that keep him connected to his community, while at the same time beautifying the place that he calls home.

Adler’s is actively involved in a number of downtown restoration projects; most recently, a major reconstruction of a beloved and dilapadated home called The Wedding Cake House (pictured below). Built in a very elaborate Italianate Style, the “Wedding Cake House” is Providence’s consummate “gingerbread” house.

We plan to provide exterior paint, as this will no doubt be an extremely visible project. The community is very grateful that this property is getting the attention it deserves so we are happy to be a part of that process.
– Harry Adler

Adler’s will provide C2 Exterior Paint for the restoration

The Kendrick-Prentice-Tirocchi House was built and designed in 1867 by Broadway resident Perez Mason for John Kendrick, a manufacturer of loom harnesses, important to 19th-century textile production. It then became the home of buttonhook manufacturer and street-railway tycoon George W. Prentice in the early 1880s. The dress-designing and making Tirocchi sisters lived here for much of the 20th-century and are the homes’ most significant occupants. Anna Tirocchi and Laura Tirocchi Cella operated A. & L. Tirocchi, as dress making shop, in 514 Broadway from 1915 to 1947, catering to wealthy clients, and the street was a beacon of wealth, sophistication and style (source: Wikipedia).

It was recently purchased by a progressive art group called The Dirt Palace, who have partnered with a variety of corporations to aid in the major overhaul of the historic building.

The Wedding Cake House project will ground innovation and creative entrepreneurship in a historical context by building out a site that connects the region’s history of design and textile manufacturing to current practices in arts and design fields, while showcasing Rhode Island as a place steeped in design thinking and visionary approaches. – The Dirt Palace

Follow us on Facebook @c2paint for updates on this ambitious restoration!

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